eye test
eye test

Scleral Contact Lenses

Scleral contacts are large-diameter gas permeable contact lenses specially designed to vault over the entire corneal surface and rest on the "white" of the eye (sclera). In doing so, scleral lenses functionally replace the irregular cornea with a perfectly smooth optical surface to correct vision problems caused by keratoconus and other corneal irregularities.
Also, the space between the cornea and the back surface of a scleral lens acts as a fluid reservoir to provide comfort for people with severe dry eyes who otherwise could not tolerate contact lens wear.

Types of Scleral

Scleral contacts are noticeably larger than standard gas permeable (GP) contacts and have a diameter equal to or greater than that of soft contact lenses. The smallest sclerals are approximately 14.5 mm in diameter, and the largest can be up to 24 mm. Corneo-scleral lenses often are a good choice for people who require larger-than-normal GP lenses for greater comfort. They also are frequently used when contact lenses are needed after LASIK or other corneal refractive surgery to correct irregular astigmatism.
More complex conditions, including advanced keratoconus, pathologically dry eyes or severe ocular surface disease that might require a large tear reservoir, often are fitted with larger scleral lenses, as they have more capacity to hold fluid or bridge large changes in corneal curvature.

Scleral For Keratoconus

Dr. Laura Ha recommend scleral contact lenses for a variety of hard-to-fit eyes, including eyes with keratoconus. In cases of early keratoconus, a standard GP lens may be used. However, if the lens does not center properly on the eye or moves excessively with blinks and causes discomfort, switching to a large-diameter scleral contact lens may solve the problem. Because scleral lenses are designed to vault the corneal surface and rest on the less sensitive surface of the sclera, these lenses often are more comfortable for a person with keratoconus. Also, scleral lenses are designed to fit with little or no lens movement during blinks, making them more stable on the eye, compared with traditional corneal gas permeable lenses.

Scleral Contact Lenses For Dry eyes and Other Eye Problems

In addition to keratoconus, scleral contact lenses can be used for eyes that have undergone a cornea transplant, and for people with severe dry eyes caused by conditions such as Sjogren's syndrome, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Advances in lens design technology are allowing manufacturers to design scleral lenses that can correct more conditions than ever before, including bifocal sclerals for the correction of presbyopia.

Specialty contact lenses are indicated for patients with keratoconus and other corneal irregularities. The cornea is the front surface of the eye and serves as a clear window that focuses light onto the back of the eye allowing us to see clearly. When the cornea becomes irregular, light rays are no longer in focus causing symptoms of blurry vision, glare, and distortion. Corneal irregularities can be caused by prior corneal surgeries (LASIK, PRK, Radial Keratotomy, corneal transplants, etc.) or corneal disease such as keratoconus, Pellucid Marginal Degeneration, and Herpes keratitis. Specialty contact lenses called scleral lenses are also indicated for patients with severe dry eye.

With mild corneal irregularities, it is possible to correct vision using glasses and soft contact lenses. In more moderate and severe conditions, glasses and soft lenses will no longer be effective. At this point it is recommended that patients are fit in corneal rigid gas permeable contact lenses or scleral lenses to obtain the best possible vision. Unlike glasses and soft contact lenses, these specialty lenses create a smooth front surface that acts as a new cornea and allow for normal vision.

Specialty lenses can also be used for patients with prescriptions too high for soft contact lenses. This includes high myopia, high hyperopia, and high astigmatism.

What is Keratoconus?

Keratoconus is a progressive eye condition that causes the cornea to thin and bulge out like a cone. Keratoconus usually affects both eyes and generally begins to fist affect vision around ages 10 to 25. Generally the majority of progression occurs in earlier on in life (teens and twenties) and slows down with age. Symptoms of keratoconus include reduced vision in glasses, glare, haloes, and distortion. Keratoconus is not usually hereditary but some people will have family members who also have the condition. The diagnosis of keratoconus is made through corneal topography that is done in office. Corneal topography maps the front of the eye showing any irregularities and changes in shape.

Does insurance cover the cost of the fitting and lenses?

Depending on your condition and your insurance, fitting and lenses may be covered. If you have any questions regarding your coverage, our staff can help go over your benefits.

How do I schedule an appointment?

Specialty lens fitting starts with a comprehensive eye examination to evaluate the health and vision. From there we can evaluate and prescribe the best lenses for your eyes. The doctors at Eyecon Optometry are passionate about fitting specialty lenses and have invested in the technology to manage and fit a variety of conditions.

What are specialty contact lenses?

Specialty contact lenses are lenses that create a new smooth surface on the eye allowing the front of the eye to bend light and focus it on the back of the eye. This allows the person wearing the lens to have their best possible vision. They differ from soft lenses in that they retain their smooth shape on the eye rather than mold to shape of the eye like soft lenses do.

There are two different types of specialty contact lenses: scleral lenses and corneal lenses. Both lenses work well in correcting vision and are made in gas permeable materials to maintain the health of the eye. Depending on your condition, one option may be better than the other.

For more mild and sometimes moderate conditions, corneal gas permeable lenses can be used. Corneal lenses sit on the cornea and are designed to move with the blink to oxygen and nutrients to circulate. Studies show that long-term comfort in corneal lenses are better than soft contact lenses. Corneal lenses are a great option for patients with mild corneal irregularities, high astigmatism, and mild dry eye. For severe conditions, corneal lenses will not properly center on the eye. This decenteration will result in reduced vision and comfort. For these conditions, scleral lenses would be the better option.

Scleral contacts are large-diameter gas permeable contact lenses specially designed to vault over the entire corneal surface and rest on the "white" of the eye (sclera). In doing so, scleral lenses functionally replace the irregular cornea with a perfectly smooth optical surface to correct vision problems caused by keratoconus and other corneal irregularities. The space between the cornea and the back surface of a scleral lens acts as a fluid reservoir to provide comfort for people with severe dry eyes who otherwise could not tolerate contact lens wear. These lenses work well for mild, moderate, and severe corneal irregularities.

Scleral Lenses for Dry Eye

In addition to keratoconus, scleral contact lenses can be used for people with severe dry eyes caused by conditions such as Sjogren's syndrome, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Scleral lenses provide a fluid reservoir to the front of the eye allowing it to stay moisturized throughout the day. Scleral lenses have been clinically proven to help the signs and symptoms of severe dry eye and are FDA approved for the treatment of dry eye.

FIND US

Eyecon Optometry

7217 Reseda Blvd.,

Reseda, CA 91335

Phone. 818-345-2010

Fax. 818-345-2070

Email. info@eyeconsee.com

Mission Hills

15336 Devonshire St.,

Suite 4,

Mission Hills, CA 91345

Phone. 818-361-4020

Email. Missionhills@eyeconsee.com

Languages Spoken: English,

Vietnamese, Spanish, Tagalog,

Chinese Mandarin (select

days)