Scleral Contact Lenses

Scleral contacts are large-diameter gas permeable contact lenses specially designed to vault over the entire corneal surface and rest on the "white" of the eye (sclera). In doing so, scleral lenses functionally replace the irregular cornea with a perfectly smooth optical surface to correct vision problems caused by keratoconus and other corneal irregularities.
Also, the space between the cornea and the back surface of a scleral lens acts as a fluid reservoir to provide comfort for people with severe dry eyes who otherwise could not tolerate contact lens wear.

Types of Scleral

Scleral contacts are noticeably larger than standard gas permeable (GP) contacts and have a diameter equal to or greater than that of soft contact lenses. The smallest sclerals are approximately 14.5 mm in diameter, and the largest can be up to 24 mm. Corneo-scleral lenses often are a good choice for people who require larger-than-normal GP lenses for greater comfort. They also are frequently used when contact lenses are needed after LASIK or other corneal refractive surgery to correct irregular astigmatism.
More complex conditions, including advanced keratoconus, pathologically dry eyes or severe ocular surface disease that might require a large tear reservoir, often are fitted with larger scleral lenses, as they have more capacity to hold fluid or bridge large changes in corneal curvature.

Scleral For Keratoconus

Dr. Laura Ha recommend scleral contact lenses for a variety of hard-to-fit eyes, including eyes with keratoconus. In cases of early keratoconus, a standard GP lens may be used. However, if the lens does not center properly on the eye or moves excessively with blinks and causes discomfort, switching to a large-diameter scleral contact lens may solve the problem. Because scleral lenses are designed to vault the corneal surface and rest on the less sensitive surface of the sclera, these lenses often are more comfortable for a person with keratoconus. Also, scleral lenses are designed to fit with little or no lens movement during blinks, making them more stable on the eye, compared with traditional corneal gas permeable lenses.

Scleral Contact Lenses For Dry eyes and Other Eye Problems

In addition to keratoconus, scleral contact lenses can be used for eyes that have undergone a cornea transplant, and for people with severe dry eyes caused by conditions such as Sjogren's syndrome, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Advances in lens design technology are allowing manufacturers to design scleral lenses that can correct more conditions than ever before, including bifocal sclerals for the correction of presbyopia.

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Eyecon Optometry

7217 Reseda Blvd.,

Reseda, CA 91335

Phone. 818-345-2010

Fax. 818-345-2070

Email. eyeconsee@gmail.com